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Always be prepared: October is National Fire Prevention Month.

Posted By Christine Cube, Monday, October 21, 2019

Fire Prevention Month

A year ago – just last November – California met its deadly Camp Fire. It was the most destructive wildfire in California history, claiming 86 lives and covering an area of more than 150,000 acres.

It’s more important than ever that we be ready for anything.

October is National Fire Prevention month. The goal of this campaign – and particularly Fire Prevention Week (Oct. 6-12) – is to increase fire safety awareness and help families prepare for an emergency. 

If you visit the National Fire Protection Association site, you’ll find a ton of information regarding fire safety, lesson plans, and videos. This month’s campaign theme: “Not every hero wears a cape. Practice and plan your escape.”

2018 Was a Hard Year for Fires

According to the NFPA Journal, 29 catastrophic multiple-death fires and explosions last year resulted in 215 fatalities.

This was topped by the Camp Fire on Nov. 8, 2018, a wildland/urban interface fire that broke out in Northern California’s Butte County. In addition to the lives lost, the fire was responsible for injuring 12, which included 5 firefighters. Property damage was estimated at more than $8 billion, wrote author Stephen Badger for the NFPA magazine.

Badger broke down the use of smoke alarms, which can reduce the risk of death in home fires. The association recommends monthly testing of home smoke alarms.

“The most effective arrangement is interconnected, multiple-station smoke alarms supplied by hardwired AC power with a battery backup,” Badger says. “These should be located outside each sleeping area, on each level, and in each bedroom. Homeowners should routinely test smoke alarms according to manufacturers’ recommendations.”

How You and Your Family Can Stay Safe

There are some fairly simple steps that homeowners can take to stay ahead of a fire emergency.

These include:

  • Never leave any fire unattended. Whether it’s burning in your fireplace at home, a campfire by your tent, or a candle sitting next to you, always keep a close eye on what’s happening.
  • Extinguish things properly. If you need to walk away from a campfire or candle, make sure it’s extinguished properly. The same goes for cigarettes.
  • If you see something, say something. This seems pretty obvious, but if you see a fire that’s unattended or burning out of control, call 911 or reach out to your fire department.
  • Handle everything with care. Double check local ordinances before burning yard waste, make sure everything is properly put out.
  • Place an alarm on every level of your home.
  • Test alarms and change batteries for existing smoke alarms (carbon monoxide is the No. 1 cause of accidental death).
  • Consider upgrading to 10-year sealed battery alarm. (These alarms are powered by long-life lithium batteries for 10 years.)
  • Stock up on fire prevention supplies, like extinguishers.
  • Look into insurance. Fire protection may not be a bad idea. Look into options that are available to you.

The Hard Truth

Mitigation measures help governments, building owners, developers, tenants and others reduce the impacts of fires.

This is especially critical because approximately 59 million people are exposed to wildfires in the U.S.

In fact, 2.5 million homes have been built in the wildland-urban interface and are so vulnerable to fire that it would be cost effective to retrofit them to comply with the 2018 International Wildland-Urban Interface Code.

These homes, plus nearby businesses and contents, are valued at approximately $1.3 trillion. The cost to retrofit properties these could run anywhere from $4,000 to $80,000.

The mix is uncertain, but even taking a conservatively high estimate of $72,000 cost to make the exterior cladding of a property fire resistant, replace windows with double-paned glass, and clear a defensible space of excess fuel, the average benefit of $130,000 still would exceed the cost.

Using a lower, but still realistic, average retrofit cost of $16,000, the benefit is still $430 billion at a cost of $53 billion, meaning $8 of avoided future losses per $1 invested.

When you strengthen one building, the benefits extend beyond the property line.

 

Wildfire mitigation more than pays for itself. Want to learn more? Visit https://www.nibs.org. Let’s be social! We’re @bldgsciences on Twitter, or you can find us on Facebook.

Tags:  mitigation  mitigation saves  wildfires 

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October’s #CampusSustainabilityMonth is a celebration that needs to happen every month

Posted By Christine Cube, Thursday, October 10, 2019

Campus Sustainability

It’s Campus Sustainability Month.

Throughout October, there are a host of events tied to greener solutions and sustainability of our nation’s college campuses.

Events are aimed at engaging and inspiring “incoming students and other campus stakeholders to become sustainability change agents,” says The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education.

We’re talking tree plantings, sustainability pledge drives, nature walks, zero-energy concerts, green sporting events, letter-writing campaigns, and sustainability competitions.

If you follow the #CampusSustainabilityMonth conversation on social, you’ll see many campuses proudly promoting their work. They include:

There’s plenty of time to participate. Here are some ideas:

Project Green Challenge (through Oct. 30). Led by Turning Green, PGC engages high school through grad school students for 30 days of environmentally-themed challenges. Since its launch in 2011, PGC has involved more than 40,000 students on 3,500 campuses. Each challenge arrives by email at 6am Pacific; challenges are live for 24 hours.

The People’s Ecochallenge (through Oct. 23). Participants select or create actions that align with individual values and make a 21-day environmental commitment to complete actions. For every completed action, participants earn points and create impact. More than 100 actions within 9 categories encourage participants to act.

Global Climate Change Week (Oct. 14-20). GCCW aims to encourage academic communities in all disciplines to engage with each other and policy makers on climate change and its solutions. Activities are aimed at raising awareness and inspiring change.

Share your successes on social media, using the hashtag #CampusSustainabilityMonth.

Want to learn more? Visit https://www.nibs.org/. Let’s be social! We’re @bldgsciences on Twitter, or you can find us on Facebook.

Tags:  sustainability 

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Straight Talk: Women Executives Discuss Issues Within the Built Environment

Posted By Christine Cube, Monday, October 7, 2019

WEB Panel
Photo: From left, Lakisha A. Woods, President & CEO of the National Institute of Building Sciences; Paula Glover, CEO of American Association of Blacks in Energy; Andrea Rutledge, President & CEO of the Construction Management Association of America, and Dawn Sweeney, President & CEO of the National Restaurant Association


It’s not every day that you gather a room full of female executives to talk about tough issues like diversity, inclusion, and management in the nonprofit built environment.

But that’s exactly what happened Friday, Oct. 4, when the National Institute of Building Sciences hosted the first Women Executives in Building Summit.

“It starts with us,” said Lakisha A. Woods, President and CEO of NIBS. “We have to talk with each other. Fifty-one percent of this country is female and over 90% of the building industry is male – there are not enough of us at this table.”

Woods was joined by a strong panel of CEOs: Paula Glover, of the American Association of Blacks in Energy; Andrea Rutledge, with the Construction Management Association of America; and Dawn Sweeney, of the National Restaurant Association. The event was held at the restaurant association headquarters. 

“Within an industry and even cross-industry, we don’t work together even though we have the exact same problem,” said AABE’s Glover.

Some of the issues discussed include balancing work and family, reaching career counselors and youth in high school and college to recruit into our industry, and whether companies are doing a good job taking care of women entering the workforce.

Building a Lasting Legacy

When Sweeney took over the helm of the National Restaurant Association in 2007, she was the organization’s first female president.

At the end of 2019, she plans to retire and says she’s proud to leave the group in “far more effective hands.”

Sweeney is talking very specifically about the association’s culture and environment.

Sweeney maintains that while restaurants are a “wonderfully diverse industry,” it’s taken some time for board representation of the national organization to catch up.

Today, 40 percent of the restaurant association’s board is made up of people of color, and 50 percent of the board are women.

Moving the Built Industry Forward

When Woods began leading NIBS in December 2018, she said the most attractive part of the job was its opportunity.

We are conveners, so we bring together the industry and find solutions to common problems.

“This is the path forward,” Woods said. “I love that our members impact where we live, work, and play. It’s not just talking about what the challenges are, but you also have to talk about solutions.”

One thing that has worked for the American Association of Blacks in Energy is a “signing day” for young people going into trades. 

“We formalize a signing day,” Glover said. “High school students [need] to feel value no matter what their path is. … Storytelling also is very important. Young people aspire to what they see.”

For women in construction, it’s imperative to “send the elevator back down,” said CMAA’s Rutledge.

“It is our obligation to send the elevator back down for the next person,” she said. “You have to make a path.”

In addition to nonprofit leaders, NIBS will open the 2020 summit to female business owners and C-suite leaders across the built environment. Follow us on social @bldgsciences and Facebook for the latest on updates. 

Tags:  Conferences 

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DC’s construction association executives are meeting. This Friday.

Posted By Christine Cube, Wednesday, October 2, 2019

WEB

In case you have not heard, the National Institute of Building Sciences is hosting a networking and industry summit to connect some very important people: Female executives from the nonprofit built world.

It’s happening this Friday, Oct. 4.

Dozens are planning to attend the first annual Women Executives in Building Summit.

We hope to open a can of worms that we all can be proud of: Conversations about diversity, inclusion, building, leadership -- the whole kit and caboodle.

The plan is to expand the event in 2020 to include female business owners and C-suite leaders across the built environment.

Lakisha A. Woods, CAE, President and CEO of NIBS, said the response to this year’s event already has been overwhelming.

“The messages are reinforcing that this was the right idea at the right time, and I’m thankful to my association friends, key members of my leadership network, and an incredible staff team who share my excitement,” she said.

We’ll be covering the event on social media. Follow us on @bldgsciences and LinkedIn to track the conversation.

Tags:  conferences 

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So you've got something to say about the built environment. We've got the meeting for you.

Posted By Christine Cube, Monday, September 30, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, September 25, 2019

The deadline to speak at Building Innovation 2020 is coming up.

What is Building Innovation? It's the only place where everyone who impacts the built environment comes to find solutions, share ideas, and discuss initiatives, practices, and policies to optimize building performance and sustainability.

In the past, conference attendees have covered every facet of building design, sustainability and management, from architecture and code enforcement to mechanical and fire-protection engineering.

For 2020, we're changing things up a bit. We've streamlined the three-day meeting into three specific tracks: Resilience, technology, and workforce.

Don’t miss this compelling program, which takes place April 6-9, 2020, at the Renaissance Arlington Capital View Hotel. This also happens to be prime time for the cherry blossoms in the nation's capital.

So if you're in the building industry, thinking of joining this world, or would like to learn more about the inner workings of the built environment, register today. And, if you'd like to present to this group, drop in your abstract before it's too late. (Oct. 11 is too late.)

We want to hear from you. 

Tags:  BI2020  Conferences 

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Wildfire season has begun. There are steps you can take to protect your home and family now.

Posted By Christine Cube, Friday, September 27, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, September 25, 2019

The situation in the Amazon has many feeling helpless.

Fortunately, there are ways you can help aid in the protection of the rainforest. And even more ways outlined by Public Radio International.

And while the world battles this dangerous disaster, two wildfires kick-started California’s fire season this week, reports The Washington Post.

Less than a year ago – just last November – California met its deadly Camp Fire. It was the most destructive wildfire in California history, claiming 86 lives and covering an area of more than 150,000 acres.

It’s more important than ever that we be ready for anything.

The National Institute of Building Sciences is working to help protect you, your home, and loved ones.

Here are some steps you can take to protect you and your family in the event of a wildfire.

You Need to Have a Plan.

Let’s talk about mitigation.

There are measures governments, building owners, developers, tenants and others can take to reduce the impacts of wildfires. This is called mitigation, and it can result in significant savings in terms of safety, prevention of property loss, and disruption of day-to-day life.

Some things always to keep in mind:

  • Never leave any fire unattended. Whether it’s burning in your fireplace at home, a campfire by your tent, or a candle sitting next to you, always keep a close eye on what’s happening.
  • Extinguish things properly. If you need to walk away from a campfire or candle, make sure it’s extinguished properly. The same goes for cigarettes.
  • If you see something, say something. This seems pretty obvious, but if you see a fire that’s unattended or burning out of control, call 911 or reach out to your fire department.
  • Handle everything with care. Double check local ordinances before burning yard waste, make sure everything is properly put out.
  • Look into insurance. Fire protection may not be a bad idea. Look into options that are available to you.

If you and your family are caught in something and you have time to grab anything, make sure it’s an emergency kit.

  • Kits should include: fresh water, non-perishable food, dry clothing, flashlight, batteries, first-aid kit, dust mask, personal sanitation items, radio (or some way to stay connected on what’s happening), and blanket.
  • Have readily available information – an updated list of contacts, including family members, hospitals, local law enforcement, and power, water and gas companies. You might want to have this stored in more than once place, in case you need to access this away from your home.
  • If you must evacuate, do it quickly and know your route ahead of time. Ideally, try to have a plan for several different routes.
  • Sign up for your community’s emergency alerts.

The Hard Truth

Approximately 59 million people are exposed to wildfires in the U.S.

Specifically, 2.5 million homes have been built in the wildland-urban interface and are so vulnerable to fire that it would be cost effective to retrofit them to comply with the 2018 International Wildland-Urban Interface Code.

These homes, plus nearby businesses and contents, are valued at approximately $1.3 trillion. The cost to retrofit properties these could run anywhere from $4,000 to $80,000.

The mix is highly uncertain, but even taking a conservatively high estimate of $72,000 cost to make the exterior cladding of a property fire resistant, replace windows with double-paned glass, and clear a defensible space of excess fuel, the average benefit of $130,000 still would exceed the cost.

Using a lower, but still realistic, average retrofit cost of $16,000, the benefit is still $430 billion at a cost of $53 billion, meaning $8 of avoided future losses per $1 invested.    

When you strengthen one building, the benefits extend beyond the property line.

Wildfire mitigation more than pays for itself. Want to learn more? Visit https://www.nibs.org/. Let’s be social! We’re @bldgsciences on Twitter, or you can find us on Facebook.

 

 

Tags:  mitigation  mitigation saves  Resilience 

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Windy City’s Building Conference Attracts Thousands From Within the Built Environment

Posted By Sarah Swango, Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Chicago sure made an impression.

The National Institute of Building Sciences sent a small team to the Chicago Build Conference and Expo Sept. 19 and 20, at the McCormick Place Convention Center.

After setting up our booth (No. 755), our marketing, sales and technical staff were swamped in the best possible way.

We were greeted with high energy, and our booth saw tons of traffic. NIBS’ staff met with a variety of architects, designers, real estate professionals, and engineers. We promoted the value NIBS membership, including being able to participate on any or all the organization’s councils. These councils include the Building Enclosure Technology and Environment Council, Building Seismic Safety Council, buildingSMART alliance, Commercial Workforce Credentialing Council, Multihazard Mitigation Council, and Off-Site Construction Council.

We also promoted attendance and sponsorship opportunities for our upcoming annual meeting: Building Innovation 2020. BI2020 takes place in the spring, right around cherry blossom time in Washington, DC.

There was so much interest.

The conversations we had were very engaging and energized. Let’s hope we were able to recruit new members, sponsors, and attendees to our annual conference.

Chicago Build was the first event of its kind for the Windy City, but the BUILD series has grown in recognition from hosting other events in New York, London, and Sydney, Australia.

For more information about NIBS membership, Kristen Petersen, KPetersen@nibs.org. And if you’d like to talk about sponsoring Building Innovation 2020, please contact me -- Sarah Swango, SSwango@nibs.org

Tags:  Conferences  NIBS in action 

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Talk about a busy summer.

Posted By Christine Cube, Monday, September 16, 2019


 

The National Institute of Building Sciences team and staff criss-crossed the country for meetings, speaking engagements, and conferences, including A’19 with the American Institute of Architects, Resilient Virginia, Disaster Resilience Symposium at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, ASAE Annual Meeting & Exposition, Energy Exchange 2019, SEAOC Convention of the Structural Engineers Association of Central California, and BIMExpo in Hanover, Germany.

 

At Resilient Virginia, for example, NIBS team member Jiqiu Yuan presented about mitigation and gave an overview of the 2020 National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program recommended seismic provisions, which have been in development by the NIBS Building Seismic Safety Council (BSSC) Provisions Update Committee (PUC). Yuan oversees the BSSC.

 

The U.S. is approaching a tipping point, with $990 billion a year being spent on new construction and buildings between 2008 to 2017.

 

The 2020 edition of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program provisions (as well as previous editions) have been sponsored by FEMA.

 

This state-of-the-art document summarizes the major code change proposals that are considered to have wide-ranging implications regarding future seismic design requirements for buildings. It will serve as a national resource for design professionals and U.S. standards and code-development agencies.

 

Also this summer, NIBS hosted a conversation to envision a U.S. national BIM roadmap led by the Centre for Digital Built Britain.

 

This week, NIBS will be at Chicago Build, a leading construction, design, and real estate show for Chicago and the Midwest. And, coming up on Oct. 4, we will host the inaugural Women Executives in Building Summit.

 

The event is being held at the headquarters of the National Restaurant Association in Washington, D.C.

 

Lakisha A. Woods, CAE, President and CEO of NIBS, says the summit is “an opportunity to bring together the unique and intelligent group of female leaders in the C-suite that represent building industry-related associations.”

 

“This is a very niche group, but it is important for us to come together to learn, share, and grow,” Woods says, in a release.

 

The NIBS team hand-picked the executives to be invited to the first annual summit. Already, the wheels are in motion to open up the event in 2020 to female business owners and C-suite leaders across the built environment.

 

Tags:  Conferences  NIBS in action 

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NIBS Staff Support Federal Energy Management Program’s 2019 Energy Exchange Show

Posted By Kyle Barry, Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Be Efficient and Resilient theme emphasizes the support of optimized operations and cost-effective and resilient projects

The National Institute of Building Sciences attended the DOE Federal Energy Management Program’s 2019 Energy Exchange and Trade Show in Denver at the end of August. The NIBS team went to support the FEMP Workforce Development program.

Energy Exchange is the federal government’s premier annual training and peer-networking event for the federal energy and water management community. This three-day event featured more than 100 training sessions, over a dozen plenary speakers, and 13 technical tracks. Here’s a snapshot of the comprehensive technical training agenda.

For sessions offering International Association for Continuing Education and Training CEUs, NIBS staff provided training on how to access session assessments and evaluation on the NIBS Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG), the learning management system for all accredited training events within the FEMP Workforce Development Program, including the Energy Exchange.

Tags:  Conferences  NIBS in action 

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Dorian is gaining strength in the Atlantic

Posted By Christine Cube, Friday, August 30, 2019

News reports say Hurricane Dorian is expected to be a Category 4 storm with 140 mph winds and could land in Florida as early as this evening. 

If this happens, Dorian would be the strongest hurricane to strike the east coast of Florida in nearly three decades. The last storm of this caliber was Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season was the third consecutive season with above-average storms. These storms caused more than $50 billion in damages.

This included Hurricane Michael -- the first Category 5 hurricane to hit the U.S. since Andrew. Michael made landfall near Mexico Beach, Florida, on Oct. 10.

The National Institute of Building Sciences is hard at work behind the scenes to help protect you, your home, and loved ones. 


It Starts With Timing

Hurricane season is here until after Thanksgiving -- the season doesn’t actually end until Nov. 30.

So whether or not you’re close to a storm, you may be affected. The outer bands of a hurricane come with storm surge, precipitation, and high winds.

There are measures governments, building owners, developers, and tenants can take to reduce the impacts of a hurricane or damaging storm. These measures—called mitigation—can result in significant savings.


What You Can Do

It’s critical to take time to assess your home and its surroundings.

  1. Start gathering information that quickly can be accessed should a natural disaster occur. You need a list of contacts – family members, hospitals, local law enforcement, schools, power companies, and insurance information. Sign up for your community’s emergency alerts.

  2. Pull together a basic emergency supplies kit – this should include fresh water, non-perishable food, dry clothing, flashlight, batteries, first-aid kit, dust mask, personal sanitation items, radio (or some way to stay connected on what’s happening), and blanket. Think ahead of where this emergency kit will be placed within your home and be sure to assemble one for every member of your family, including the furry ones.

  3. Have an evacuation plan and know that depending on the circumstances, it may change. Brief your family on the plan and their individual roles or duties.


Prepare Your Home

Now that you’ve assessed your surroundings and collected supplies, let’s address your home. Take inventory of valuables and personal belongings, and make sure your insurance policy is up to date.

As far as hurricane-proofing your home as best as humanly possible, there are many affordable ways to pull this off.

  1. Unplug electronics and install surge protection throughout your house for the things that must stay plugged in. The aim is to minimize the chance of fire.

  2. Cover the outdoor air conditioning unit. This will help protect against flying debris and other things that may get lodged inside the unit.

  3. Speaking of flying debris, trim trees and clear away loose debris from around your property. This includes lawn furniture and decorations.

  4. Don’t forget to check gutters and drains. In the event of flooding and high water, this step is critical to minimizing standing water.

  5. Stock up on plywood and secure and seal windows and doors. If you have a garage door, don’t forget to brace it. This will help ensure wind or water damage doesn’t enter the house from the garage.

  6. Check your sump pump to make sure it’s in working order.


The Hard Truth

Every state in the nation is at risk to more than one kind of natural disaster. When it comes to hurricanes: Approximately 127 million people are exposed.

In 1990, just before Hurricane Andrew struck, new buildings built to the 1990 BOCA National Building Code or 1991 Standard Building Code had several vulnerabilities when subjected to high hurricane winds. Specifically, poor connections between roofs and walls, loss of roof decking, increased internal pressures, and water intrusion from windborne debris resulted in widespread hurricane wind damage.

Since 1990, building codes have been strengthened based on lessons learned after later hurricanes. Today, modern building codes have improved our disaster resilience to hurricanes and floods by serving as the baseline to protect our built environment and setting the minimum safety requirements for structures.

The National Institute of Building Sciences has found that compared with a generation ago, code development in these areas saves an estimated $11 for every $1 invested in mitigation efforts.

Want to learn more about the built environment? Visit https://www.nibs.org/. Let’s be social! We’re @bldgsciences on Twitter, or you can find us on Facebook.

 
 
 
(Photo credit: National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration) 

Tags:  mitigation  resilience 

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